Tire Types

Tires are grouped into certain groups depending on the type of vehicle they are intended for.

Competition Tire (Street Legal)

D.O.T. street legal tires are not intended to be driven in snow, on ice or even on the street. These are special-use tires for racetrack or rally performance, and feature purposeful tread designs, high-grip tread compounds and tuned internal constructions to provide the ultimate in acceleration, cornering and braking traction for track and competition use.

Standard Passenger Tire – All Seasons

Performs in all seasons, including light snow. A dependable tires with good comfort and wear.

High Performance Tire/High Performance Comfort – All Seasons

Performs in all seasons, including light snow. Enhanced handling and performance over a passenger or touring tire.

Note: Low-profile, street-sport performance truck tires are also found in this group.

Ultra High Performance – All Seasons & Summer

Tires that are the best in its category. They use the latest technologies and materials to provide the best performance in its category. Designed for high performance applications in wet and dry conditions with advanced handling characteristics. High performance tires usually have a shorter tread life.

Light Truck – Load Carrying, Standard Use, Off-Road Flotation & Sport

A general tire for light truck and SUVs. All season applications. A dependable tire with good comfort and wear. Increased handling in bad weather conditions over a passenger or performance tire.

Note: Low-profile, street-sport performance truck tires are found in the "performance" group.

Winter – Studdable & Non-Studdable

For use in winter or colder conditions for increased safety. Winter tires stop 42% shorter than all-season tires in temperatures below 45 degrees when stopping from 35 miles per hour. Enhanced traction on snow and ice. Winter tires are not ideal for warmer temperatures because they have a louder ride and reduced tread life than all-season tires. Tires can be pinned or non-pinned for studding.